ANALYZING SKIER/RACER PERFORMANCE


In my last post (1.), I showed photos of Tessa Worely, Federica Brignone and Mikaela Shiffrin with their outside legs extended with small angles at their knees and ankles and asked Why is their outside leg extended? What advantage does it give these racers? How does it affect their ability to load and control their outside ski? So far there has only been one comment that didn’t address the questions I posed.

……… the study of biomechanics by physical educators must include cause as well as effect relationships which exist between sequential joint motions of the performer and the motion of the inanimate objects which he or she wears, rides or manipulates.

All factors must be studied in terms of the skill objective. If problems are noted in the performance of the skill, where did they originate? Within the performer? Within the sport object? Both? What precise changes must be made to obtain the skill objectives? The answer to the last question leads directly to what is known as quality teaching. The directions for improvement given to the performer must be based on scientific and technical analysis of the total skill.

The above excerpts are from a book published in 1983 called ANALYSIS OF SPORT MOTION by John W. Northrip. 

….. quality teaching – coaching of neuromuscular skills in physical education should always be preceded by an analytical process where the professional physical educator synthesizes observations and theory from scientific and technical perspectives……It must be remembered that the teaching of physical education is an art with a basis in science.

 Adjustments during the teaching process to improve performance must be made in sequential motion pattern of the involved joints. Therefore, the student of physical education must have functional knowledge of anatomic kinesiology.

Fast forward to 1987.

Few forms of athletics place as high demands on the footwear used in their performance as alpine skiing. It (the ski boot) functions as a connecting link between the binding and the body and performs a series of difficult complex tasks. 

Dr. med. H.W. Bar, Orthopedics-Sportsmedicine, member of GOTS, Murnau, West Germany (2.)

In my next post I will attempt to provide an explanation of the effect of extending the outside knee and ankle in the load phase of a turn and the role of equipment in enabling (or preventing) this action using the knowledge I have gleaned over the past 40 years.


  1. WHAT DO BRIGNONE, WORLEY AND SHIFFRIN HAVE IN COMMON?
  2. Der Schu im Sport