REVISIONS TO CORE CONCEPTS


Due to recent interest in CORE CONCEPTS on the HOME page menu (above), I have started to revise it. The current version appears below. Links to a number of pertinent papers and videos by Dr. Emily Splichal (Evidence Based Fitness Academy – EBFA ) have been appended to CORE CONCEPTS.


As bipeds, we propel our bodies forward by moving from one fascially tensioned base of support with foot to core sequencing on one foot to another fascially tensioned base of support with foot to core sequencing.

Skiing uses the same basic pattern. In skiing, we need to establish a fascially tensioned base of support with foot to core sequencing on one foot in order to be able to move with precision to another fascially tensioned base of support with foot to core sequencing on another foot. As far back as the 70’s, the famous French ski technician, Patrick Russell, said that the key to effective skiing is to ‘move from ski to ski’. What Russell was really alluding to is the process of alternating single limb support.

Ever since alpine skiing became formally established, it has been known that the best skiers move from the outside ski of one turn to the outside ski of the next turn. Although this may sound simple enough, the key to being able to effectively move from ski to ski (foot to foot) is the ability to establish a fascially tensioned base of support with foot to core sequencing one foot and then use it to move the body or Centre of Mass to the new outside foot (current uphill ski) of the next turn. Good skiers do this so seamlessly that turns seem to have no beginning or end. The turns just flow together. When viewed in the context of stance and swing phases, the resembles to walking becomes apparent,

How to make skiing as intuitive as walking is what this blog is about. I devoted an entire series of patent to this subject commencing with US Patent No. 5,265,350 and associated international patents on the elements of a minimal ski boot necessary to accommodate the process of establishing a fascially tensioned base of support with foot to core sequencing on one foot and transitioning seamlessly back and forth between bipedal and monopedal stances.

The ability to balance multi-plane torques on the outside leg of a turn is, and continues to be, the secret of the worlds’ best skiers including Toni Sailor, Nancy Greene Raine, Pirmin Zubriggen and, today, Mikaela Shiffrin, Lindsey Vonn and Ted Ligety to name but a few.


A REVIEW OF GAIT CYCLE AND ITS PARAMETERS – Ashutosh Kharb1, Vipin Saini2 , Y.K Jain3, Surender Dhiman4 – https://ijcem.org/papers72011/72011_14.pdf

Dynamic loading of the plantar aponeurosis in walking – Erdemir A1, Hamel AJFauth ARPiazza SJSharkey NA. – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14996881

Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running – Luke A. KellyGlen Lichtwark, and Andrew G. Cresswell – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4277100/

The Foots Arch and the Energetics of Human Locomotion – Sarah M. Stearne, Kirsty A. McDonald, Jacqueline A. Alderson, Ian North, Charles E. Oxnard & Jonas Rubenson – http://www.nature.com/articles/srep19403

Shoes alter the spring-like function of the human foot during running – Kelly LA1, Lichtwark GA2, Farris DJ2, Cresswell A2. – J R Soc Interface. 2016 Jun;13(119). pii: 20160174. doi: 10.1098/rsif.2016.0174. – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27307512


The Science of the Human Lever: Internal Fascial Architecture of the Forefoot with Dr. Emily Splichal – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_35cQCoXp9U