A SKIER ASKS QUESTIONS ON BOOT-FITTING 101: THE ESSENTIALS


After my last post BOOT-FITTING 101: THE ESSENTIALS – SHELL FIT, I received an email from a Whistler skier asking a number of questions. I have copied and pasted the questions into the post below and inserted my answers


Whistler Skier: After reading your last two posts and going through all the information about boot fit, the tongue and where your shin should contact the boot/liner, I probably need  to punch the shells a bit wider in the ankle area of the navicular bone (it definitely needs more room when I go from bipedal to monopedal stance).

Answer: Make sure forefoot width is adequate first.


Whistler Skier: 

  • Do you want a full finger width between all parts of the shell and your foot?

Answer: No. Just behind the heel. A few mm clearance to 1st and 5th toe joints and inside ankle bones is usually sufficient if the liner is thin enough in those areas.


Whistler Skier: 

  • Should I just experiment with padding of different thicknesses over my forefoot to try and keep my foot in contact with the bottom of the boot?

Answer: TONGUE CHECK will be the subject of a future BOOT-FITTING 101: THE ESSENTIALS post.


Whistler Skier: 

  • When I put the boot on and lightly buckled, I can still ‘stand on my toes’, so:
    • Is that because my foot is not sitting in the heel pocket?

Answer: I suspect you aren’t standing in an SR Stance. If you were, you would not be able to stand on your toes.


Whistler Skier: 

  • I gather from your postings that I don’t want to add foam to the front ‘crook’ of my ankle to hold it in the heel pocket because it will impede the natural ankle movement on flexion?

Answer: Yes. It might not impede the natural ankle movement. But at the same time, L-pads do nothing useful if the foot is stiffened by fascial tension. It is the age old problem of what is easier to nail to a tree, liquid Jello or frozen Jello?


Whistler Skier: 

  • If so, how do I get my heel to stay in the heel pocket? (do I want it there?)

Answer: Wedge fit loading of the instep of the foot with forefoot portion of the boot tongue. The key is ensuring fascial tensioning can occur in the boot because it makes the foot behave as it were solid, not malleable. Conventional boot fitting strategies attempt to achieve this objective by encasing the foot with a form fitting medium. This has the exact opposite effect. It actually prevents fascial tensioning.


Whistler Skier: 

  • Should I hold off on punching the ankle area?

Answer: For the time being. If it is close, skiing will confirm whether or not the space is adequate.

Whistler Skier: 

  • i.e., Is the space already large enough?

Answer:  I don’t know. See above.

Whistler Skier: 

  • Is it the cuff of the boot that provides control in conjunction with the sole of the foot?  My shin seems to contact the front cuff of the boot right about where your diagrams indicate it should and there is no pressure further down the cuff.

Answer: Sounds good.


The key that has literally been under everyone’s feet for decades, while they threw out nonsensical theories on skier balance, is what I call Ground Control. Given the correct sequencing of events, fascial tensioning in combination with pronation of the outside foot in a turn, enable pelvic rotation of the femur to extend the ground (snow) under the inside edge of the outside ski up under the base of the ski.

The mechanics of Ground Control has the effect of bringing the ground (snow) up under the entire ski base and foot thus allowing a skier to actually balance on the outside ski as if they were standing with their outside foot in full contact with solid ground (snow). This was my hypothesis that the Birdcage experiments confirmed in 1991.