SR STANCE BASICS: RAMP ANGLE TIPPING POINT


If you have made a Stance Ramp or are planning to make one, it is important to use stiff material for the platform you stand on. This especially important if you are heavy. If you are not sure whether the platform is stiff enough, reinforce it with one or more stiffeners to ensure that it does not flex under your weight and give a false ramp angle.

Studies performed in a science lab typically have protocols that ensure that apples are being compared to apples. Subjective drills done without such protocols or technical supervision may not be as accurate. But they will give you a kinaesthetic sense of how ramp angle affects your stance on skis and especially where the Tipping Point is where the amount of ramp angle has a negative effect.

Drills

Drills are best done barefoot on both feet (bipedal stance).

Drill 1

  • Assume an upright stance on a hard, level surface like a tile or wood floor. You should feel slightly more pressure under your heels than under the balls of your feet. Pay close attention to the sensations in your feet, legs, buttocks and back.
  • Move forward in the hips until you feel the pressure increase under the balls of your feet. Pay close attention to the sensations in your feet, legs, buttocks and back and note any changes.
  • Now do the same drill on the Stance Ramp with 2.5 ramp angle.
  • Note any changes in the pressures felt under the heel and balls of the feet and especially the sensations in your legs, buttocks and back.
  • Go back and forth between standing on the hard, level surface and the Stance Ramp and compare the pressures felt under the heel and balls of the feet and especially the sensations in your legs, buttocks and back.

Do you feel the same or stronger and more stable on the flat hard floor or on the Stance Ramp with 2.5 degrees of ramp angle?

Drill 2

  • Starting on the hard, level surface, relax your ankles and allow them to assume the Resistive Shank Angle. Bend forward slightly in the waist to find a comfortable, balanced position. Pay close attention to the sensations in your feet, legs, buttocks and back.
  • Move forward in the hips until you feel the pressure increase under the balls of your feet. Pay close attention to the sensations in your feet, legs, buttocks and back and note any changes.
  • Do the same drill on the Stance Ramp. Go back and forth between the hard, level surface and the Stance Ramp and compare the pressures felt under the heel and balls of the feet and especially the sensations in your legs, buttocks and back.

Do you feel the same or stronger and more stable on the flat hard floor or on the Stance Ramp with 2.5 degrees of ramp angle?

Drill 3

In checking the Net Ramp Angle of a sample of the boots and bindings of recreational skiers I have found that it is usually about 5.0 degrees. What I term the Critical Angle seems to be above 3.0 degrees. Studies need to be done to confirm this. You can quickly get a subjective sense of how 5.0 degrees of ramp angle affects your stance in skiing by doubling the 2.5 degree angle of the Stance Ramp

  • Place a shim of the same thickness  under the load point of the rear shim of the Stance Ramp as the shim that was used to achieve the 2.5 degree angle in the Stance Ramp. This will double the 2.5 degrees of the Stance Ramp to 5.o degrees.
  • Do the same drills as Drills 1 and 2.
  • On the 5.0 degree Stance Ramp, play close attention to the pressure under the heels and especially any changes in perceived stability as you move forward in the hips to increase the pressure under the balls of the feet.

Where do you feel strongest and especially most stable? With the pressure under your heels or under the balls of your feet?

Drill 4

  • Do the same drills as Drills 1 and 2 except alternate back and forth between the Stance Ramp with 2.5 degrees of ramp angle and the Stance Ramp with the 2.5 degree shims in place that increase the ramp angle to 5.0 degrees.

At which angle do you feel strongest and especially the most stable; 2.5 degrees or 5.0 degrees?

In my next post, I will discuss fine tuning ramp angle with the Stance Ramp